50|50 Episode 13 – 3 Sept 2012

Tuna

Global tuna stocks are down by 90% or so they have been saying for a while now, but we still see shelves and shelves of tinned tuna in our shopping centres. Internationally, sushi is readily available with tuna in it. So what is the problem? The blue-fin tuna, one of the ocean’s top predators is the most threatened although it is not fished in South Africa. We in SA, have yellow-fin, albacore and skipjack species of tuna that have different lifecycles and are generally fished more sustainably here. Unfortunately, this may not be the case when blue-fin tuna has been fished to extinction… the rest of the species may then see the same fate. People are greedy. In South Africa, the tuna we pull out of the ocean does not make its way into our tins and onto our plates. So where does our tinned tuna come from? And how can we guarantee the fishing methods were safe and sustainable.  What are the different fishing methods? What difference does it make how or where the fish are caught? How can we as the consumers dictate what we want to eat? 50|50 goes to sniff out if there’s something fishy happening!

Black footed Kittens

Last year we followed the story of two of Africa’s smallest cats, black-footed cat siblings. These two cats were found on the side of the road, rescued and set free into the Ezemvelo Nature Reserve. Many experts and scientists carefully selected their new home but how have they fared? Did the cold Highveld air get the better of them over winter? These two cats seem to have surpassed all expectations. Nyane, the little female cat, found a mate shortly after her release and gave birth to 2 beautiful kittens later in the summer.  The mother moves her kittens from burrow to burrow before they are old enough to leave her protection. We watch as, for the first time, the kittens’ behaviour is been recorded in the wild. This is a heart-warming example of a great conservation success.

Woolies Defynne

It was back in 2001 that Jacky Goliath and Elton Jefthas, both of whom worked for NGOs, came up with the idea of turning Elton’s backyard in Kylemore, outside Stellenbosch, into a nursery. With their knowledge of local fynbos, they chose three different species to start, and soon had 1000 plants growing in little pots. They called themselves De Fynne Nursery. As a born and bred South African company, Woolworths is proud to have a range of indigenous plants, including fynbos and fruit trees, as part of its horticulture range. But rather than being produced by a large, well-established commercial horticulture supplier, these unusual and attractive plants are grown for Woolworths by this small Western Cape enterprise that literally started as a backyard business.

VeldFokus

This week is a big deal on VeldFokus as the Big 5 throw their weight around. Buffalo and lion play it out and the smallest of the big, a newborn elephant arrives on the scene.

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